Serigraphy

 
Victoria-Riza Screenprinting
 

Watercolor and ink have been very absent from my life lately. Well, I got ink in my life, just printmaking ink. Yeah, printmaking has taken over my life since I started back into it in September. If you follow me on Snapchat, you'll see that I've been doing serigraphy, or commonly known as screen printing. 

I first stumbled upon screen printing in high school when I was studying Andy Warhol. However, I was doing it old school. And old school screen printing is having to place the screen on yourself. Then you would hand paint the filler onto the screen to create the stencil. No handy-dandy, quick and easy photo emulsion. That means it is a way long process AND the filler is permanent. So you'd have to have multiple screens per image instead of one where you can just wash out the stencil. 

So learning this brand spanking new process just blew my mind! I mean, don't get me wrong, it's still a long process. It's just a tad quicker. So here it is. 

 
 
Victoria-Riza Screenprinting
Victoria-Riza Screenprinting
 

This beautiful green stuff is the photo emulsion. You know I have such an obsession with the color green. Usually it's with food. So this photo emulsion stuff being green is a problem because sometimes I'm tempted to lick it. It's a very lick worthy green. 

The photo emulsion is evenly spread onto the silkscreen using this gold spready-on-thingy (okay okay, I don't know the proper name for things). It's spread on thinly on both the front and the back. This all has to be done in the dark room to prevent the emulsion from being exposed. Once the emulsion is dried, a negative (a solid black image on a transparent sheet) is placed on the screen with a glass sheet on topping it all off. The screen is then exposed with very bright and very hot lights for approximately eleven minutes. Once the screen is exposed, the screen is washed to remove the emulsion that wasn't exposed. And ta-da a stencil is created!!!

Now to ink. The edges of the screen is covered with butcher paper and packaging tape to keep everything all nice and clean when ink is pulled through. This whole process is repeated for each color. So in my case, I did this whole process five times. Four colors and the key. A very tedious process indeed, but the results are amazing. So stay tuned! 

 
 
Victoria-Riza Screenprinting
Victoria-Riza Screenprinting
 
Victoria-Riza Screenprinting